Fractions to Decimals #1

Fractions to Decimals #1

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Expressing fractions using points is called decimal notation. Decimal notations, which we often encounter in daily life on price tags (such as $ 3.50), measurements (such as 1.5 Libres), are a different way of expressing fractions. In this topic, we will learn how fractions are expressed in decimal notation, and how to read and write decimal notations. 

Fractions with denominators 10, 100, 1000 can be expressed as decimal notation. In decimal notation, a point separates the whole part and the fractional part.[1]

Example:  In 6.75 decimal notation, the part before the point (6) is the whole part, and the part after the decimal point (75) is the fraction part.

Fractions with a denominator of 10 have 1 digit after the decimal point, fractions with a denominator of 100 have 2 digits after the decimal, and decimal representations of fractions with a denominator of 1000 have 3 digits after the decimal point. 

Example: Let’s express the numbers 1/10, 1/100, and 1/1000 in decimal notation. Since these fractions are simple fractions, that is, they do not have whole parts, 0 is written in their decimal notation. 

1/10 = 0.1 

1/100 = 0.01

1/1000 = 0. 001

Example: Let’s express the numbers 6/10, 42/100, and 23/1000 in decimal notation.

6/10 = 0.6

42/100 = 0.42

23/1000 = 0.023

Fractions that do not have a denominator of 10, 100, and 1000 are made equal to 10, 100, or 100 by simplifying and expanding. It can then be expressed in decimal notation.

Example: Let’s express the numbers 2/5, 11/20, and 40/125 in decimal notation. 

2/5, when we expand it with 2 it becomes 4/10 which is 0.4 

11/20 when we expand it with 5 it becomes 55/100 which is 0.55

40/125 when we expand it with 8 it becomes 320/1000 which is 0.320

Improper fractions can be expressed in decimal notation after conversion to mixed fractions. 

Download the worksheet for free at HERE

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